Better Care Together

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People from the Barrow area have more confidence to manage their musculoskeletal conditions thanks to exercise programme

Twelve people from Barrow, Millom and Dalton, have been attending an exercise programme at the gym at Hoops Basketball Centre, Barrow, to help them cope with osteoarthritis (chronic joint pain) of the knee and hip, and initial feedback has been positive.

The Enabling Self-Management and Coping with Arthritic Pain using Exercise (ESCAPE-pain) programme is aimed at people over 45 years old who have osteoarthritis of the knee and hip.

People attend 12 one-hour sessions, twice a week, over a six week period. The sessions involve a 15-minute talk which includes educational self-management and coping strategies, followed by a 45-minute exercise programme individualised for each person.

GPs, Consultants and other Healthcare Professionals refer people to University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust’s (UHMBT) outpatient physiotherapy service for assessment and the physiotherapist identifies appropriate people for the ESCAPE-pain programme.

Helen Carter, of Barrow, who has suffered from osteoarthritis of the knee for 25 years, was referred to the programme by the Trust’s physiotherapy team based at Abbey Road, in Barrow.

She said: “I was diagnosed with osteoarthritis when I was 33 and I was told that I would need a new knee but I didn’t want to go down that route.

“Before I started coming here I had to walk using a walking stick and I felt very unconfident about leaving the house but the sessions have really given me the confidence to leave the house and I now only use the stick when I really need to.

“The whole process has been really professional and a really good example of GPs, the hospital and the physiotherapy teams working together. I would recommend to others who are suffering from similar conditions.”

Jane Graham, of Askam, who has rheumatoid and osteoarthritis of the knee, added: “I have a lot of pain in my knee and have had to visit my GP many times in the past. The programme has given me the confidence to exercise and I have seen some improvement in the pain. I will definitely carry on doing these exercises after the course finishes.”

Ruth Marrison, Specialist Musculoskeletal (MSK) Physiotherapist, UHMBT, said: “We have had some great feedback from everyone who has attended the sessions. They are really helping people to understand their conditions and how they can cope better with pain through exercise.”

The ESCAPE- pain programme started on 23 July 2019. The team hopes to hold a future session at Hoops Basketball Centre, Barrow, from 17 September to 25 October. The team then hold sessions in the new Alfred Barrow Health Centre once it has opened.

Twelve physiotherapists at the Trust were trained to carry out the ESCAPE – pain programme, which is funded by the Health Innovation Network.  The programme was introduced as part of the Better Care Together Integrated Musculoskeletal (iMSK) programme of work. ESCAPE – pain is an evidence-based programme which has benefitted more than 11,000 people across the UK who suffer from osteoarthritis.

You can find out more information about ESCAPE – pain at https://healthinnovationnetwork.com/projects/escape-pain/

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Refreshing the Better Care Together strategy

More than 100 colleagues, from across Bay Health and Care Partners, attended a workshop at Kendal Rugby Club last month to talk about  the Better Care Together (BCT) strategy. There was a lot of support for the general BCT Strategy

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More than 1,500 patients handed greater control over their care

The ‘Patient Initiated Follow-Up Service’ (PIFU) was introduced as a pilot by the Trust in February 2017 in rheumatology and 1,534 patients under different specialities have transferred onto this new system since the launch. Rather than waiting for an appointment

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Community eye care service provides more than 9,000 appointments closer to home

Thanks to hospital and community staff working more closely together, thousands of patients who would have previously had to come into hospital for their eye care have had their appointments at local opticians, closer to their homes across South Cumbria

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More than 900 patients handed more control over their care

The ‘Patient Initiated Follow-Up Service’ (PIFU) was introduced as a pilot by the Trust in February 2017 in rheumatology and more than 900 patients under different specialities have transferred onto this new system since the launch. The aim of the

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One response to “More than 900 patients handed more control over their care”

  1. Claire Wilson says:

    I attend the rheumatology clinic in Ulverston and find the team are very friendly and helpful.

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Specialist clinics for those with musculo-skeletal conditions in South Cumbria becomes permanent

A new service for patients referred to the orthopaedic service – where they see a physiotherapist in special clinics rather than a consultant surgeon – has become permanent after an eight month trial period. In the integrated musculo-skeletal (iMSK) service

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6 responses to “Specialist clinics for those with musculo-skeletal conditions in South Cumbria becomes permanent”

  1. Ann Allison says:

    Hi,

    I have severe arthritis, can my GP refer me ? or through a consultant, I am a patient of Dr F.Wood,Consultant Rheumatologist.

    Many thanks,

    Ann Allison

  2. Ann Allison says:

    Good morning, please moderate my reply and answer my question.

    Thank you.

  3. Why was my reply not added after moderation.? With brittle asthma type 2 & bronchiectasis, plus chronic osteoarthritis I need to know about this. If no one has the time, let me know where the Heysham Unit is situated and there is a a similar service at WGH ?

    Jim Allison
    retired Welfare Rights Lawyer.

    • Ailsa Martin says:

      Hi Jim, I have passed your details onto Barry Rigg, our Community Engagement Manager, who will contact you as soon as possible about volunteering with us. The Trust does not operate a Heysham Unit, if you contact our WGH switchboard on 01539 732288 they will be able to put you through to the most relevant unit in the hospital. Hope this helps.

  4. Thank you so much for your reply. I think this service is remarkable, saving appointments for Orthopaedic Surgeons such as Mr Radcliffe and Mr Stuart for those who need surgery.

    Pleased to hear the trial went well, and this initiative is now permanent through UHMBT.

    Dr Jim

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Local clinicians come together to reduce number of strokes in Lancashire and South Cumbria

Clinicians from across Lancashire and South Cumbria are coming together to try to reduce the number of people in the area that suffer strokes, and improve the services for those that do go on to have a stroke. Stroke is

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One response to “Local clinicians come together to reduce number of strokes in Lancashire and South Cumbria”

  1. Penny Pullen says:

    The article below was printed in the Daily Mail recently and my own research has proved that we need magnesium to be healthy and transdermal is the best way to bring it into the body. e.g. Epsom Salt baths and floatation therapy when 1,000 pounds of Epsom Salts is dissolved in a foot of water at blood heat and you float for an hour. I can vouch for the fact that this therapy is pure ‘heaven…’ (We also need good quality natural sea salt in our diets and Dead Sea Salt in the bath is a good idea. Refined salt should be kept to sprinkle on the pavements during a hard Winter as it is very harmful if ingested…)

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4797166/Will-popping-magnesium-pills-cure-aches-pains.html

    Extract:-

    STROKE RISK

    A study published in the journal Stroke said it had been found men and women reduced their stroke risk with a higher intake of magnesium. ‘We don’t know exactly why this happens, but one theory is magnesium reduces inflammation in the body,’ says Professor Welch.

    Studies also show higher levels of dietary magnesium can help to reduce hypertension and cholesterol levels — both risk factors for stroke.

    HEALTHY HEARTS

    Tracy Parker, Heart Health Dietitian at the British Heart Foundation (BHF), says: ‘Some research indicates that eating foods rich in magnesium is linked with a positive impact on heart disease risk factors such as lowering blood pressure.’

    Magnesium also plays a role in the heart’s electrical functioning by which it beats, and studies show it can relieve atrial fibrillation, or unusual heart rhythms.

    Dr Sarah Myhill, a GP in Powys, explains: ‘In the heart muscle and elsewhere in the body, calcium is needed to help excite muscle cells and cause contractions, whereas magnesium is involved in getting the muscle to relax.

    ‘If you don’t have enough magnesium, the muscle doesn’t relax as it should and the rhythm of the heart can go awry.’

    DIABETES CONTROL

    Type 2 diabetes, a lifestyle disease linked to obesity, affects more than four million people in the UK.

    In a large study published in 2013, researchers found that magnesium intake protected people against the disease.

    And magnesium deficiency has been linked to insulin resistance and poor glucose regulation.

    Dietitian Clare Thornton-Wood says: ‘Magnesium deficiency could be contributing to insulin resistance. The data so far warrants further research.’

    (I am a retired school teacher and health researcher. Aged 73 this year, I have never felt better….)

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Patient Initiated Follow-Up service to be rolled out across more specialities

A service aimed at putting control back into the hands of patients is to be rolled out to five more specialities across University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT). The Patient Initiated Follow-Up Service was introduced as a

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4 responses to “Patient Initiated Follow-Up service to be rolled out across more specialities”

  1. Ailsa Martin says:

    Hi Sue, sorry for the late reply. The patient initiated follow up service is part of the Better Care Together strategy. You can find their contact details here: http://www.bettercaretogether.co.uk/page.aspx?ID=7

    Hope this helps!

  2. Richard Thorn says:

    Hi,

    I have just been reading your recent article on patient initiated follow up and I am keen to find out more about exactly how the scheme works as it is something we have discussed loosely with our provider here but never really made any headway with. I am particularly keen to know exactly how it differs from basic open follow up appointments – our Trust offers these for a 6 month period for some patients, often post surgical and having spoken to a few other places doing ‘Patient Initiated Follow Up’ they seem to be doing just that but branded differently, whereas my take was that proper PIFU would include a much stronger patient education element and provision of support materials and often be used for long term conditions.

    I have tried using the link about to the Better Care Together site, but the contact us email address just comes back as undeliverable.

    Thanks

    Richard

  3. David Arlitt says:

    I love the fact that gastroenterology is on the list of new specialties. We’re thinking more and more about what types of medicine are conducive to this type of program, and gastroenterology is something we keep coming back to at our practice.

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Diabetes Centre will open at the RLI in April

The Diabetes Centre will be dedicated to specialist outpatient services for people living with diabetes in North Lancashire. Nurse-led clinics will move over to the centre in April with consultant-led clinics following shortly after. The centre will support the education

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New service will mean less anxiety and more guidance for patients

A new service for rheumatology patients is being introduced by University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust (UHMBT) to allow them to receive support when they require it. The Patient Initiated Follow Up Service has been specifically designed for

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